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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to hold, it is central casting cliche downgrades. i suspect you will be hearing one of them tomorrow about lennar, the great home builder no doubt because of stretch valuations. lack of catalyst. don't be surprised when they tell us the same thing in the end about facebook. it turned out to be as powerful as blockbuster video? repeat after me, stretch valuations and no catalysts. maybe they were waiting to get kicked to the curb. maybe something else at work that can make us some money. first, let me just say that this market has been nothing short of remarkable. apple, bad estimate cut. this stock seems to cut the heart out of this market every day. like the weird guy in "temple of doom." it is getting ugly out there. and it is so bad on twitter some holders are blaming my daughter for not liking the new itunes. we had horrendous headlines of a total government shutdown. still, it may lead to a downgrade in us debt. we are being told that the debt ceiling wrangling could be even worse for the country than going over the fiscal cliff. how is that for frightening? senator freddy krueger ver
cliches. the republican party wants to stop this government, blame them. will that work its way into the news coverage? will the people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> it seems like that has happened every time. that the republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made, because they have been doing a bit of foot-dragging. so he is definitely laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in the press conference, which i think people will resonate with, which is this whole idea, if you go out and buy an expensive bill, when the check comes, you can't refuse to buy the bill. he is likening that to refuse tolerate the debt limit. it resonates with people and they can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> just to check, glenn, do you think people in the tea party think that they're paying the bill or not paying the bill, or do you think they're saying yes or no to spending, the way they look at it? >> oh, yeah. i think what they think is they're lookin
's a failure to pay bills, don't look at both sides. none of the malarkey and cliches. will that work its way into news coverage? will people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> well, it seems like that has happened every time. that republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made. because they have been doing a bit of foot dragging. so he definitely is laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in that process conference which i think people will resonate with which is this idea if you go out and buy an expensive meal, you can't when the check comes refuse to pay the bill. he a likening that to a refusal to raise the debt ceiling. it resonates to people who can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> glenn, do you think the people in the tea party are paying the bill or not paying the bill or saying yes to spending? the way they look at it. >> i think what they think is they're looking at a different set of polls that say a significant portion of the electorate c
cliche into that final quarter of the year and you saw the market largely shrugged it off. >> brown: a butte is more picturesque than the cliff, but go ahead. yes. >> yes, indeed. so i feel that investors at least are not bothered about this. they see this as a game of chicken going up and down pennsylvania between the white house and congress. and much of this has been kicked down the road effectively for a couple of months. we do know that we have an unsustainable budget deficit situation but on the flip side you have economists like paul krugman out there saying do not worry about the budget deficit, this is not the time to be slashing public spending. as you saw, that actually helped push that economy into decline in the final quarter. that was a big variable in that. so this is a huge debate. but on balance what you're seeing is a lot of the unexpected has surprised the positive. you mentioned housing, housing is not just virtuous in that it helps homeowners and construction workers out there and material suppliers, it's also helping the banking sector which, after all, gorged
to say it is, such a cliche, kicking the can down the road again. >> we have to deal with this, this is wasteful spending. we have an element no one is talking about i want to introduce on the show. you have exponential growth of debt due to compounded interest. we have structural problems the way we handle our money system. this is something that we're going to have to address sooner or later. you can kick the can down the road but we'll still have debt. we have to deal with the underlying issues how these debts are created. cut the wasteful spending but also look at the, at the system that we have that causes the debt to grow exponentially because of the come pounded interest. melissa: peter, i'm worried we're in real trouble here. seems like we're not tackling this problem. >> we are in real trouble. we're to the point where raising taxes alone will not put us in a position where we can get our debt and deficit growth under control. you know if we raised everybody taxes by 25%, we wouldn't raise enough taxes to solve the deficit problem but yet we throw the economy into a te
't want to say it is, such a cliche, kicking the can down the road again. >> we have to deal with this, this is wasteful spending. we have an element no one is talking about i want to introduce on the show. you have exponential growth of debt due to compounded interest. we have structural problems the way we handle our money system. this is something that we're going to have to address sooner or later. you can kick the can down the road but we'll still have debt. we have to deal with the underlying issues how these debts are created. cut the wasteful spending but also look at the, at the system that we have that causes the debt to grow exponentially because of the come pounded interest. melissa: peter, i'm worried we're in real trouble here. seems like we're not tackling this problem. >> we are in real trouble. we're to the point where raising taxes alone will not put us in a position where we can get our debt and deficit growth under control. you know if we raised everybody taxes by 25%, we wouldn't raise enough taxes to solve the deficit problem but yet we throw the economy into a te
will be on display. let go of the cliche of the boys' club. among the 100,000 or more who flooded south beech this weekend, meet two women, some of the most outspoken superfans here. >> we bleed blue and gold. >> reporter: molly's father, a former halfback for notre dame. >> my dad played football for notre dame. my grandfather played for knute rockne. >> reporter: for her, football is more than game. it's a tradition. a way of life. >> notre dame is about family. friendship. faith. it's that community that unites us and sustains us. that's why there's such a great following. >> reporter: janice bleeds football, too. hers runs alabama crimson. her father played for the tide. she's one of four generations of family who have attended the university. >> i've loved football all my life. not just because my dad was an all-american and i was raised in it. it's just an awesome sport. a good way for us all to come together. >> reporter: the only thing they disagree upon who will hoist the coveted trophy. >> go irish! >> roll, tide! >> and you can watch tig best of all games tonight on espn, full cove
understand when people say one time you watch it, and you can't stop watching. i know it sounds cliche, but they did look incredibly shocked on the they were all excited just to be there. first time ever at the screen actors dwu s guild, most of the. >> it's nice to see people in hollywood genuinely happy. >> he says with sarcasm. >> no, i mean it. no cynicism on "early start." you should know that. >> show me the surprise face again. >> so much good tv and movies. is it always like this? i feel so much good stuff, my productivity has gone down considerably. >>> breaking news overnight. chris brown got into an all-out brawl with another singer and his people. details, next. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. two. three. my credit card rewards are easy to remember with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things
and keeping their powder dry if i can cram some cliches in there. it's unusual to do an interview when you're awaiting confirmation. you're supposed to do an immediate blackout. he chose his hometown newspaper to do it. while do we care about this as a political story, will he be confirmed or not? everybody thinks in the end he will be. senator schumer is key here. a democratic nominee who doesn't have a scandal or personal scandal, all about policy, very rare to beat somebody just on policy, particularly if it stays an inside game. are there people in washington, in elite circles who want to stop hagel? absolutely. is the public engage on this? no way, not now. the challenge for the people who oppose is to do one of two things, either get the public engaged and say we want to stop chuck hagel, unlikely or pick off a prominent democratic senator who says i can't support this person. schumer is the key. if schumer supports hagel, almost impossible to stop him. >> i have to say, not to -- i feel like this is all - all -- especially the extreme opposition here, it's kind of a waste of time. t
. speaker, some might say that saying those things is a cliche. but as we all know, members are going to have to engage with and rigorous debate, and there it is going to be the clash of ideas, a rigorous debate, but it needs to be done with good faith and the spirit of compromise. i realize and some argue that compromise is a sign of weakness. in fact, one of the great strengths, mr. speaker, of our nation's founders, was their ability to compromise. the very structure of this institution, the united states congress, the very structure of our institution, which joined the people's house, where we are all privileged to serve, with the united states senate, was known as what? the connecticut compromise, or the great compromise. that is the very basis of our founders. too often we forget that while we should never, we should never compromise our principles, we must always, mr. speaker, we must always be prepared to compromise in the service of our principles. a couple weeks ago, "the economist" described another example of compromise -- this one that justice brandeis described as "one o
the border is secure. that is very, very important. and the devil is, to use a cliche, in the details there. also goes for how they detyfine path to citizenship. >> jessica, you're getting some new information about the white house, the president is planning to propose, maybe as early as tomorrow, when he's in las vegas. >> the difference between the president's plan and what the senate has proposed is the path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants who are here illegally. the senate plan, as you've explained, would require essentially officials verify that the u.s. border is secure before any of the immigrants, these immigrants can begin signing up for citizenship. the president's proposal would include no similar border security trigger, if you will. now, to help the president press his case, beginning next week, a grassroots coalition that the white house has actually been working with for months dating back to the president's -- the type the president was campaigning for re-election. the coalition will begin a campaign next week that's called bibles, badges and business. it's a gr
're across the street from here is -- it is almost cliche, but it is amazing. there is one building that is completely destroyed. another building that is damaged, but not destroyed at all. and just on the other side of that, completely destroyed another building. this tornado came through here and just was very selective, but completely devastating in the targets it found. >> it is almost like it sounds like that zigzag we hear so often when we talk about tornadoes. miguel, thank you so much. george, let me bring you in. i hope you have a monitor. have you seen pictures of this, this tornado we have been showing out of adairsville, georgia? >> well, i've seen a few clips from the adairsville tornado and it looks like something that i would be used to seeing in kansas, in may. so it is very ahtypical for thi time of year. but we occasionally get deep south tornado outbreaks in late january, february. they tend to be fast moving storms and therefore quite dangerous. but they do happen. and people that live in that part of the country really do need to watch it pretty much year round.
of the most overused played out, annoying cliche phrases in the history of words. a list has been reloosed by lake superior state university of phrases from 2012 that should be banned from the english language. fiscal cliff, good luck on that. spoiler alert. bucket list, trending. and yolo, the acrow number meaning -- i never heard that. >> steve: my kids say that all the time. >> brian: what does it mean? >> steve: you only live once. yolo. >> brian: really? ban ago phrase i never heard. >> steve: 12 minutes after the top of the hour on this tuesday. coming up, the fiscal cliff, i know we're -- we're supposed to stop using the word. not only the only word on americans' minds, today more. today we'll meet a guy who says he may have to lay off workers because of the obama taxes. >> brian: will lawmakers say more money in their paychecks? i heard this deal kills that raise 9d ad [ male announcer ] coughequence™ #8. waking the baby. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robi
was really -- in the '90s, i was the cliche actress/waitress/dog walker, you know, all of it. i was very lonely. i was very hungry. i was eating mcdonald's like $2 specials every day. and i thought, oh, my god, i think i made a serious mistake, even though i loved what i was doing. i was confused and my mother, who is a very gifted astrologier, did my chart and she was saying if you can hold out and if you can keep your will, everything is going to change in your favor. and long story short, it did. and in a very small period of time, i got an agent and i did a play and a movie. though i wasn't making any money, it really brought me to realize that i was in the right path. >> you've been rewarded now with the success of this show. we saw some of the problems you have at home. now apparently this season things get even more interesting at work with a bit of a love triangle, is that right? >> yes. there's a love triangle. it's at work. it's at home. and it's something that i think the audience really -- there's a lot of team nico and team matt, which i love. i like old school love triangle
right, and i think that falls in the phase zero. you have to have skip in the game, i know it's a cliche, but if you're not there present, then the asians question extraordinarily why you're going to come in when the stakes get much higher, and they don't even need to think out to the existential question of soviet -- chinese icbms just hoping for the good old days hoping things were much clearer, chinese icbms raining down on them and does the nuclear umbrella still hold? as you point out, we've already been doing offshore balancing even while being present because we've had the filipinos, the japanese come to us in these territorial disputes and say are you backing us up, and what are you doing? the administration's response has been we take no position on sovereignty issues, we want to see the status quo maintained, but it's up to you to solve it. now i think, ironically, the right position. it's not for us to defend ya pap's territory, but it is for us to understand how the balance of power in the region is changing, and by not reacting we are changing the actions of our allies. and
's make an clich if you don't mind. >> kneal franklin, director of law enforcement in prohibition. we hear a lot about leadership. steve said something about leadership and since you talked about this as we have no leadership there is this an opportunity for the president, and what is the president's latitude? i know the executive branch enforcement but what is the president's latitude, and what can he do, what can the white house do and what should he do? i'm hoping these answers get to him. >> let's go to the gentleman. we also have a couple tweets. >> i'm with the governing magazine. i want to go back to the broad federalism issue which i talked to several people that said as much as jonathan, that between gay marriage, the affordable care act and marijuana were kind of redefining federalism in a lot of ways or we could be. so i wanted to ask you and i know this is intentional, but what are the potential ramifications for the system of government depending on how the various the dates are put out? >> i love how we saved a little questions for the end. >> ashley from l.a. is asking how m
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)